Catalyst 2024 Program
Opens Jan 31 2024 12:30 PM (CST)
Description

**TRISH is currently considering Catalyst applications for funding in Tier 1 and Tier 2; however, as a result of timeline constraints greater priority will be placed on Tier 1 and one-year projects where possible. **  

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) is an applied space health research catalyst supported by the NASA Human Research Program (HRP) to fund disruptive, high-impact scientific studies and technologies to equip astronauts for space exploration. TRISH relentlessly pursues and funds novel research to deliver high-impact scientific and technological solutions that advance space health and help humans thrive wherever they explore, in space or on Earth. 

TRISH supports programs in physical and mental health surveillance, prevention, countermeasures, and medical treatments. Since its inception, TRISH has funded over 150 projects that have advanced medical science for both our world and the worlds that lay beyond. As the only institute dedicated to promoting space health discoveries and technologies, TRISH is accelerating research that will benefit all people with a future in deep space and here on Earth.

Founded on October 1, 2016, TRISH works in partnership with NASA’s HRP through Cooperative Agreement NNX16AO69A. Led by Baylor College of Medicine’s Center for Space Medicine, TRISH’s consortium leverages partnerships with the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). More details on TRISH, its mission and funding opportunities can be found at https://www.bcm.edu/spacehealth.

TRISH recognizes the need to encourage innovation among the space health community, to attract cutting-edge technologies and high-risk, high-reward ideas, and to translate existing technologies for use in space flight. All proposals should be sure to clearly justify how the project will reduce risks to human health and performance in space.  

The Catalyst Grant Program offers a streamlined method for carrying out proof-of-concept projects, directed technology development(s) for space health that address a critical need(s), maturation of promising concepts with strong preliminary findings, and innovative projects that present opportunities outside of regularly scheduled solicitation cycles. 

In keeping with the TRISH mission of translating and maturing novel approaches, TRISH may identify specific project(s) for deeper investigation or collaboration opportunities with other funded researchers. 

Our primary goal is to help mitigate NASA HRP’s Human Research Roadmap (HRR) Risks and enable future Artemis missions and deep space exploration.  

Eligibility 
All categories of United States (U.S.) institutions and companies are eligible to submit proposals. Principal Investigators (PIs) may collaborate with universities, the private sector, and federal, state, and local government laboratories. In all such arrangements, the applying entity is expected to be responsible for administering the project according to the management approach presented in the proposal. For our policy on international proposers and institutions, please refer to the FAQ and FAR Supplement 

Award Information
Tier 1 projects are a maximum total amount < $150K and limited to one year. 
Tier 2 projects can reach a total amount of ≥ $150K for up to two years. 


Please note that the Catalyst Program has limited budget availability. TRISH seeks research that enables and enhances human exploration of space beyond low-Earth orbit. Catalyst Projects MUST: 

  • Have a focus that falls outside of a currently open or recently-closed TRISH solicitation.
  • Address a critical human system risk challenge for NASA HRP and TRISH.
  • Represent unique and high-impact ideas, technologies, or countermeasures to space flight hazards.

Selected proposals will be funded as research grants. Multi-year proposals will be funded in one-year increments. Additional funding allocations to participating investigators will be based on the submitted budget, available funds, programmatic alignment, and project review.


Catalyst Priorities

TRISH strongly encourages proposers to review the following bullets to ensure the relevance of their proposed research, technology, countermeasure, or idea to TRISH: 

  • The environment of space is one that includes many simultaneous stressors which impact numerous biological systems at once. With restrictions on mass, power, volume and crew time for space missions, many single-point solutions have limited application for future space travel. Therefore, TRISH encourages cross-discipline and cross-risk work, as well as multi-use technologies. For the list of Human Research Risks please see the NASA HRR (https://humanresearchroadmap.nasa.gov/). 
  • TRISH encourages proposers to take into account the Institute’s mission and goals which include supporting research for NASA’s future Artemis missions. Artemis Program goals focus on landing humans on the moon and eventually on Mars. Note that early Artemis missions will focus on the Moon specifically, but these missions can also be considered as a testbed for Mars missions in accordance with NASA’s future plans (https://www.nasa.gov/specials/artemis/).   
  • TRISH encourages proposers to consider that Artemis missions, especially late Artemis, will have significant time delays for communications, limited connectivity and lack of or minimal resupply capability.   
  • TRISH encourages projects whose endpoints could be space flight implementable within a near-term (3 years or less) expected timeframe, suitable for the Artemis Program. TRISH will prioritize highly relevant proposals that make a strong case for maturing enough to reach an implementable deliverable within 3 years.   
  • Given significant restrictions on mass, power, volume, crew time, resupply, connectivity, and communication delays, TRISH allows maturation of existing technologies, countermeasure candidates, or research focus areas provided a strong case is made for reaching an implementable deliverable within 3 years.  
  • TRISH may also consider projects that will mature or translate their research for potential inclusion in a future commercial space flight mission.  
  • TRISH encourages methods that are out-of-the-box, challenge assumptions, and could lead to extraordinary outcomes.  
  • TRISH seeks new ways to partner with stakeholders, new approaches to find promising technologies, or new methods to extend TRISH’s reach into emerging areas with the potential to reduce, maintain, or enhance human health (physiological/psychological) and performance during deep space missions. 

TRISH discourages the following types of proposals:  

  • TRISH discourages projects that provide a single-point solution (see above).  
  • TRISH discourages work that is primarily in animal models with no translation toward human cells, tissue chips, organs, or human subjects.  
  • TRISH will not consider Catalyst proposals on topics that are the same as NASA or TRISH solicitations that are currently open.  
  • Any proposals focusing on complex invasive procedures will need to clearly justify why the procedure would likely be feasibly implementable and required during the expected timeline of the Artemis Program.  

The Catalyst Program Solicitation

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) - Updated on 04/05/2024

Sample Size Guidelines

VACS Instructional Document

Budget Template

DMP Template

Back to Solicitation List

Apply

Catalyst 2024 Program


**TRISH is currently considering Catalyst applications for funding in Tier 1 and Tier 2; however, as a result of timeline constraints greater priority will be placed on Tier 1 and one-year projects where possible. **  

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) is an applied space health research catalyst supported by the NASA Human Research Program (HRP) to fund disruptive, high-impact scientific studies and technologies to equip astronauts for space exploration. TRISH relentlessly pursues and funds novel research to deliver high-impact scientific and technological solutions that advance space health and help humans thrive wherever they explore, in space or on Earth. 

TRISH supports programs in physical and mental health surveillance, prevention, countermeasures, and medical treatments. Since its inception, TRISH has funded over 150 projects that have advanced medical science for both our world and the worlds that lay beyond. As the only institute dedicated to promoting space health discoveries and technologies, TRISH is accelerating research that will benefit all people with a future in deep space and here on Earth.

Founded on October 1, 2016, TRISH works in partnership with NASA’s HRP through Cooperative Agreement NNX16AO69A. Led by Baylor College of Medicine’s Center for Space Medicine, TRISH’s consortium leverages partnerships with the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). More details on TRISH, its mission and funding opportunities can be found at https://www.bcm.edu/spacehealth.

TRISH recognizes the need to encourage innovation among the space health community, to attract cutting-edge technologies and high-risk, high-reward ideas, and to translate existing technologies for use in space flight. All proposals should be sure to clearly justify how the project will reduce risks to human health and performance in space.  

The Catalyst Grant Program offers a streamlined method for carrying out proof-of-concept projects, directed technology development(s) for space health that address a critical need(s), maturation of promising concepts with strong preliminary findings, and innovative projects that present opportunities outside of regularly scheduled solicitation cycles. 

In keeping with the TRISH mission of translating and maturing novel approaches, TRISH may identify specific project(s) for deeper investigation or collaboration opportunities with other funded researchers. 

Our primary goal is to help mitigate NASA HRP’s Human Research Roadmap (HRR) Risks and enable future Artemis missions and deep space exploration.  

Eligibility 
All categories of United States (U.S.) institutions and companies are eligible to submit proposals. Principal Investigators (PIs) may collaborate with universities, the private sector, and federal, state, and local government laboratories. In all such arrangements, the applying entity is expected to be responsible for administering the project according to the management approach presented in the proposal. For our policy on international proposers and institutions, please refer to the FAQ and FAR Supplement 

Award Information
Tier 1 projects are a maximum total amount < $150K and limited to one year. 
Tier 2 projects can reach a total amount of ≥ $150K for up to two years. 


Please note that the Catalyst Program has limited budget availability. TRISH seeks research that enables and enhances human exploration of space beyond low-Earth orbit. Catalyst Projects MUST: 

  • Have a focus that falls outside of a currently open or recently-closed TRISH solicitation.
  • Address a critical human system risk challenge for NASA HRP and TRISH.
  • Represent unique and high-impact ideas, technologies, or countermeasures to space flight hazards.

Selected proposals will be funded as research grants. Multi-year proposals will be funded in one-year increments. Additional funding allocations to participating investigators will be based on the submitted budget, available funds, programmatic alignment, and project review.


Catalyst Priorities

TRISH strongly encourages proposers to review the following bullets to ensure the relevance of their proposed research, technology, countermeasure, or idea to TRISH: 

  • The environment of space is one that includes many simultaneous stressors which impact numerous biological systems at once. With restrictions on mass, power, volume and crew time for space missions, many single-point solutions have limited application for future space travel. Therefore, TRISH encourages cross-discipline and cross-risk work, as well as multi-use technologies. For the list of Human Research Risks please see the NASA HRR (https://humanresearchroadmap.nasa.gov/). 
  • TRISH encourages proposers to take into account the Institute’s mission and goals which include supporting research for NASA’s future Artemis missions. Artemis Program goals focus on landing humans on the moon and eventually on Mars. Note that early Artemis missions will focus on the Moon specifically, but these missions can also be considered as a testbed for Mars missions in accordance with NASA’s future plans (https://www.nasa.gov/specials/artemis/).   
  • TRISH encourages proposers to consider that Artemis missions, especially late Artemis, will have significant time delays for communications, limited connectivity and lack of or minimal resupply capability.   
  • TRISH encourages projects whose endpoints could be space flight implementable within a near-term (3 years or less) expected timeframe, suitable for the Artemis Program. TRISH will prioritize highly relevant proposals that make a strong case for maturing enough to reach an implementable deliverable within 3 years.   
  • Given significant restrictions on mass, power, volume, crew time, resupply, connectivity, and communication delays, TRISH allows maturation of existing technologies, countermeasure candidates, or research focus areas provided a strong case is made for reaching an implementable deliverable within 3 years.  
  • TRISH may also consider projects that will mature or translate their research for potential inclusion in a future commercial space flight mission.  
  • TRISH encourages methods that are out-of-the-box, challenge assumptions, and could lead to extraordinary outcomes.  
  • TRISH seeks new ways to partner with stakeholders, new approaches to find promising technologies, or new methods to extend TRISH’s reach into emerging areas with the potential to reduce, maintain, or enhance human health (physiological/psychological) and performance during deep space missions. 

TRISH discourages the following types of proposals:  

  • TRISH discourages projects that provide a single-point solution (see above).  
  • TRISH discourages work that is primarily in animal models with no translation toward human cells, tissue chips, organs, or human subjects.  
  • TRISH will not consider Catalyst proposals on topics that are the same as NASA or TRISH solicitations that are currently open.  
  • Any proposals focusing on complex invasive procedures will need to clearly justify why the procedure would likely be feasibly implementable and required during the expected timeline of the Artemis Program.  

The Catalyst Program Solicitation

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) - Updated on 04/05/2024

Sample Size Guidelines

VACS Instructional Document

Budget Template

DMP Template

Back to Solicitation List

Apply
Opens
Jan 31 2024 12:30 PM (CST)